Recap

The Curse of Oak Island: Lagina brothers finally get their X marks the spot for gold at the Money Pit

Rick Lagina smiling in the War Room
Rick Lagina thinks they can start digging for the Money Pit gold immediately. Pic credit: History

The Curse of Oak Island team finally knows where the gold at the Money Pit is buried. A “pink blob” on a geologist’s electronic slide has pinpointed the whereabouts of gold buried near the garden shaft in the Money Pit area.

There was tons of stuff happening in last night’s episode of The Curse of Oak Island, ranging from a brand new mysterious feature with ancient pottery discovered on Lot 5 to a medieval spike found near the swamp.

But the main area of interest focused around a “pink blob” that marks the whereabouts of a large deposit of gold in the Money Pit.

It all began with geologist Dr. Ian Spooner collecting water samples from various boreholes around the Money Pit and putting them in little plastic bottles. Marty Lagina joked about how after 200 years of vast expense and digging, the secret to the island may be contained within a little plastic bottle.

The point of Ian’s task was to trace the gold in the water and determine where the source might be. And it looks like the answer is buried approximately ten feet to the west of the garden shaft.

The guys assembled in the War Room, and Marty wanted to “know about the gold.” Luckily, Ian didn’t disappoint, he eventually produced a slide featuring a pink blob on a map of the Money Pit area, and he said this is where the gold lies.

The gold at the Oak Island Money Pit should be easy to access

And there was more good news. Ian and his colleague hydrogeologist Dr. Fred Michel told the team the deposit is likely at the relatively shallow depth of between 80 and 110 feet.

This depth range is somewhat significant. In 1804, the Onslow Company, while digging a shaft at the Money Pit, discovered a mysterious inscribed stone at 90 feet. The stone was suspected of being a marker for the treasure.

The Onslow workers then dug into a flat platform or unknown vault structure but were forced to abandon the dig when the shaft flooded. The Oak Island team has speculated that those workers might have hit upon the treasure vault.

Marty asked his brother Rick Lagina if there was any reason why they couldn’t chase this right away and start digging immediately. Thankfully, Rick couldn’t think of one, so fingers crossed, the guys will begin digging on the next episode. “Onward and into the blob,” joked Marty.

Map of pink blob at the Money Pit
Steve Guptill created a map of the area featuring the pink blob. Pic credit: History

Once the Dumas mining company has obtained the proper permits to recommence the excavation of the garden shaft, then the guys will be able to utilize their equipment and further explore the “pink blob.”

Archaeologists discover a new mysterious feature on Oak Island’s Lot 5

Meanwhile, on Lot 5, metal detectorist Gary Drayton found some intriguing pottery. This led to Laird Niven and his team of archaeologists moving in to take over the operation. And it seems as though they’ve found yet another mysterious feature. Typical Oak Island!

It’s early days yet in the investigation, but there appears to be a purposefully buried stone structure that features numerous pieces of pottery. The pottery is highly decorated and tin-glazed, meaning it can be dated circa 1650 to 1750.

Laird reckons the pottery is English in origin, but what on earth was it doing buried in an area where there has been no human habitation? It’s yet another Oak Island mystery.

We also saw the return of archaeologist Miriam Amirault, who hasn’t been seen by viewers on the island since December 2021.

Miriam Amirault and Laird Niven on Oak Island
Miriam Amirault, Laird Niven, and the rest of the archaeological team have begun work on Oak Island. Pic credit: History

The Lagina brothers decided to ditch most of the archaeologists when the local authorities asked them to cease operations in a large area of the swamp. Miriam was a fun addition to the team at the old stone roadway, and it’s great to have her back.

The Curse of Oak Island airs Tuesdays at 9/8c on History.

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Joe Scales
Joe Scales
3 days ago

Even clicking on the link for the “Onslow Company” above will reveal there is absolutely no record of the company ever existing, let alone working on Oak Island. The tale was fabricated in 1849, a year rife with treasure scams. As for gold, it would not be unusual to find the trace amounts of its existence in such an area. I mean, there was a gold mine once on the mainland not too far from the island. It’s a naturally occurring element which is why there is only a miniscule trace of it when tested. But no, they want you to believe it means gold bullion is shedding itself below, which is wholly ridiculous.

What they haven’t done, and will not do, would be to take water samples from the surrounding areas. They won’t do that as they’d likely reveal the same trace level amounts of gold making their findings on Oak Island moot. So once again, they are making mountains out of molehills, claiming a treasure exists despite absolutely no evidence for same. And spoiler alert here… if they ever did find anything, it would be news and you’d hear about it months before any episode would air. So you know they’re not going to find anything this year, and I know they never will.