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Enso Rings from Shark Tank: What are the benefits and where can you buy them?

An Enso Ring on a rock climber's hand
One of the offerings from Enso Rings, which provide a safer alternative to metal rings

This week’s Shark Tank sees entrepreneurs Brighton Jones and Aaron Dalley pitching for their business Enso Rings — a silicone alternative to metal jewellery rings.

But are the benefits and where can you buy them?

The co-founders, from Midvale, Utah, are both big on adventuring, but believe that when you’re an active person wearing a metal ring can not only be an inconvenience — but also dangerous.

Take rock climbing for example. With a metal ring, not only do you risk the jewellery being damaged, but if it gets caught in a bad position when you come off the rock it could severely injure your finger, or worse — rip it off altogether, causing a potentially life-changing and horrific injury.

For some other things, like cooking, metal rings can just get in the way.

That’s where the silicon Enso Rings are said to come in — providing a safe and stylish alternative which are practical to wear and don’t get in the way of everyday and active tasks.

They describe their product as the “safest, most versatile” rings on the planet.

The firm has several different styles both for men and women, including wedding bands and ‘stacks’ — which are three thin rings of different colors that you can combine together in any design you like.

There are also ‘hero’ stacks, where a portion of the sale goes to helping first responders and their families — either the police, firefighters, or EMS depending on which design you go for.

They also have a ‘Rings for a Reason’ which sells different rings throughout the year to make money for good causes. In October, they are selling a variety of pink ones from which a portion of proceeds will go to help fund breast cancer research.

The rings are currently available on the Enso Rings website.

Shark Tank airs Sundays at 8/7c on ABC.

Julian is the editor of Monsters & Critics. He has worked as a journalist for more than ten years, previously as an editor at the... read more
Julian Cheatle

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