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Joel Embiid injury update: What is a torn radial collateral ligament?

Joel Embiid injury update: What is a torn radial collateral ligament?
Joel Embiid suffered a ligament tear. Pic credit: ESPN/YouTube

The Philadelphia 76ers released some Joel Embiid injury information today and it sounds like the team will be without their All-Star for a lengthy period of time.

Here is a look at all the news, including when the 76ers expect him back.

Joel Embiid injury update

The Philadelphia 76ers (via ESPN) reported on Thursday that Joel Embiid suffered a torn radial collateral ligament in the fourth metacarpal in his left hand.

While that is a lot of big words, the biggest takeaway here is that there no timetable for the big man’s return. Embiid will consult with his doctors about the recovery steps.

Embiid will miss the Thursday night game against the Boston Celtics. This is a tough break for the 76ers, who rank fifth in the East and are 2 1/2 games back of the Celtics.

“Nobody’s crying. This is not a woe-is-me moment for our players,” 76ers coach Brett Brown said.

As we previously reported, the injury took place in the 76ers win over the Oklahoma City Thunder on Monday night. He dislocated his finger in that game and finished with them taped up.

What is a torn radial collateral ligament?

For those fans interested in the medical outlook for Joel Embiid, he suffered a torn radial collateral ligament in the fourth metacarpal in his left hand.

So, what is a radial collateral ligament?

According to Merriam-Webster, it is the ligament on the outer middle joint of the thumb that connects the head of the metacarpal bone with the adjacent phalanx.

The good news for Embiid is that these injuries are fairly common, although not all of them result in a tear. According to NCBI, experts believe that both acute and chronic grade 3 RCL tears should be surgically treated.

Stable injuries seen early should be treated with prompt immobilization. Casting may be more effective than a removable splint. Grade I-II injuries seen early treated with four to six weeks of splinting had excellent results in clinical tests.

A minor tear could only take a week and a half to heal enough to return to sports.

Shawn S. Lealos has been a freelance writer for 25 years, starting with magazines and newspapers before moving to the internet. He has been published... read more

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