‘The End of the Line’ a frightening call to action, DVD out Feb. 23

“The End of the Line” is a frightening call to action documentary on the ocean’s plight, specifically regarding the fish populations of all the seas.

Starring Ted Danson as the narrator, the DVD will be available to rent and own next Tuesday, February 23rd. 

Trailer from theatrical:

Imagine a world without fish, filmmaker Rupert Murray did, and he has produced “The End of the Line.”

“The inconvenient truth about the impact of overfishing on the world’s oceans.”–The Economist

This is the future—in less than 40 years—if we do not stop, there will be no fish claims Murray.

Narrated by Ted Danson and based on the book by Charles Clover, The End of the Line shows firsthand the effects of our global love affair with fish as food.

It examines the imminent extinction of bluefin tuna, the huge overpopulation of jellyfish and the prospect of certain mass starvation.

According to Greenpeace, the reality of modern fishing is that the industry is dominated by fishing vessels that far out-match nature’s ability to replenish fish.

From Greenpeace:

“Giant ships using state-of-the-art fish-finding sonar can pinpoint schools of fish quickly and accurately. The ships are fitted out like giant floating factories – containing fish processing and packing plants, huge freezing systems, and powerful engines to drag enormous fishing gear through the ocean. Put simply: the fish don’t stand a chance.

Ocean life health check

Populations of top predators, a key indicator of ecosystem health, are disappearing at a frightening rate, and 90 percent of the large fish that many of us love to eat, such as tuna, swordfish, marlin, cod, halibut, skate, and flounder – have been fished out since large scale industrial fishing began in the 1950s. The depletion of these top predator species can cause a shift in entire oceans ecosystems where commercially valuable fish are replaced by smaller, plankton-feeding fish. This century may even see bumper crops of jellyfish replacing the fish consumed by humans.

These changes endanger the structure and functioning of marine ecosystems, and hence threaten the livelihoods of  those dependent on the oceans, both now and in the future.”

Filmed over two years across the world – from the Straits of Gibraltar to the coasts of Senegal and Alaska to the Tokyo fish market – featuring top scientists, indigenous fishermen and fisheries enforcement officials, this documentary serves as a wake-up call to the world.

Endorsed by National Geographic and Greenpeace, The End of the Line premiered at 2009’s Sundance Film Festival and went on to a limited national theatrical release.  In January 2010, the filmmakers launched a nationwide “Fish ‘n’ Flicks” dinner/screening campaign with some of America’s most renowned and ecologically conscious chefs to educate guests about what they can do to end overfishing. 

Timed to hit stores prior to the March vote by the Convention on International Trade to ban the overfishing of bluefin tuna, the documentary arrives on DVD and digital format on February 23rd, 2010 from Docurama Films.

DVD BONUS MATERIALS:

    * Ocean-Friendly Seafood Guide: A wallet-sized sustainable fish guide insert
    * Six webisodes: Over 50 minutes of in-depth behind-the-scenes featurettes
    * Video Message from Ted Danson
    * Short Film- “The Coral Triangle: Nursery of the Seas”
    * Trailer
    * Filmmaker Biography

FILMMAKERS:

Executive Producers: Christopher Hird and Jess Search

Editor: Claire Ferguson

Producers: Clare Lewis and George Duffield

Narrated by: Ted Danson

Directed by: Rupert Murray

TECHNICAL INFORMATION:

Catalog #:         NNVG169491                Language:         English

Rating:              N/A                               Color:               Color

Running Time:   83 mins + extras            Audio Format:   Stereo 

Genre:              Documentary                Website: http://endoftheline.com/                              

Note the date on this article may be incorrect due to importing it from our old system.