Louis C.K. Opens Up on Growing Up, Plus ‘Louie’ Back May 5 on FX

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C.K. on GQ – Credit: Peggy Sirota/GQ.

The drought is nearly over.

Louis C.K. is back in a big way! After a 19-month hiatus, television’s most-critically acclaimed comedy series Louie will make its season four debut on Monday, May 5 at 10:00 PM E/P, and FX will air two all new episodes of the Emmy® Award winning show back-to-back every Monday at 10:00 and 10:30 PM E/P for seven consecutive weeks through June 16.

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The series is a semi-fictional version of Louis C.K. played by C.K. and filtered through the observational humor of “Louie.” Each episode puts a spotlight on “Louie’s” hectic life as a stand-up comedian and single father who shares custody of his two daughters, “Lilly” (Hadley Delaney) and “Jane” (Ursula Parker).

The single-camera comedy is a mix of “Louie’s” stand-up comedy and scripted films. The series deals with everyday life issues including work, parenting and relationships, and has touched on topics ranging from religion to politics to social behavior. While many of the episodes are stand alone, the series has also included many serialized episodes, which will hold true in season four.
GQ interview C.K. for their May issue too. The May issue on newsstands nationwide April 29

Comedy is subjective, but not with Louis C.K. He’s the best, which is why we named him the funniest man alive. GQ’s Andrew Corsello catches up with the May cover man and explores his comedic genius. Excerpts from the GQ story below:

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C.K. on GQ – Credit: Peggy Sirota/GQ.

C.K. on discomfort:

“You’ve got to embrace discomfort. It’s the only way you can put yourself in situations where you can learn, and the only way you can keep your senses fresh once you’re there.”

C.K. on sitting with the black kids at lunch at his predominately all-white junior high school:

“It was awkward and scary, but I made a lot of black friends, and that was the only way to do it. It had to be uncomfortable. It was actually racist, ’cause I was sitting down with these kids only because they were black. Sometimes discomfort is the only way through.”

C.K. on wanting to be suicidal:

“No, I’ve never been suicidal. But I’ve wanted to be.”

“It never stopped getting worse. I remember thinking, This is too much for me to handle. I wanted to give up. I knew it was my right to. But then a few minutes would go by and I’d realize, I’m still here. In other words, there was no escape from it. And I’d be a little disappointed at not being truly suicidal. I hated being ‘all right.’ ”

C.K. on his kids:

“They do surprise you. When my older daughter was about 8, I showed her the routine where I get explosively angry because she sucks at hide-and-seek. She thought it was hilarious. My girls and I make a lot of dark jokes together. In the upcoming season [of Louie], there’s a line from a conversation I had with my older girl. She was saying how whenever she sees a three-legged dog, it lifts her spirits, because three-legged dogs are wonderfully unaware that they have a malady. They just walk around, and they don’t give a shit. And I said, ‘You know, honey, they are lucky. But do you know the only thing luckier than a three-legged dog? A four-legged dog.’ And she really laughed. Whenever she laughs that hard at something dark? I know it’s good.”

 

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