Julianne Moore Is More On Point Than Ever In Her Career

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Why Alec Baldwin Calls Her “Unstoppable”… How Her Kids Influenced Her Hunger Games Role and How Being Older Has Made Her Feel More Empowered

Oscar winner Julianne Moore and her award-winning role in “Still Alice” were featured in the November 2014 issue of MORE magazine.

On film and television, Julianne Moore has made a name for herself playing wound-up, emotionally intricate women—but in real life, Moore is a no-frills Greenwich Village wife and mother of two who’s not afraid to take charge.

In the November issue of More magazine, on newsstands October 28, Moore talks about how “knowing your own desires” has empowered her to not be shy about going after what she wants, including her kick-ass role in the The Hunger Games: Mockingjay—Part 1 and Part 2.

She also shares her take on her five most memorable characters and more:

On Julianne’s career, Alec Baldwin, her costar in the film, said:

Alec Baldwin: “A lot of people work when they’re young and then their lives evolve. Some of them drop off or only work now and then. Then there are women like Julie: They get married, have a family and do remarkable work year after year. It’s hard for men to do that, but it’s even harder for women. She’s unstoppable that way.”

Julianne also comments on how getting older has changed her views on Hollywood and the choices she makes:

Julianne Moore:  “I used to think, Life’s really challenging. Things are tough, so they should be tough in a book, in a movie. They should be sad,” she says. “But the older I get, the more I like happy endings.”

“When you’re starting out in this business, you feel like you’re not in charge, that you’re still looking to the world for a kind of validation. But as you get older, you realize that direction comes from yourself, from your own desires and responsibilities. You choose your work. You choose your life. That’s where your power comes from—and that’s a great feeling.”

What Julianne would do more of if she could start over:

Julianne Moore: “Skiing. I’m terrified of skiing and I can’t get over the hump.”

On how her kids influenced her signing on for Mockingjay:

Julianne Moore: “For a child moving into adolescence, the big question is, Do I have free will? Can I determine my own future?” she says. “[At that age] you’re still with your parents. But you’re asking yourself, Who am I?” Most of the films I make are not for kids. My son was in line for the midnight show when The Hunger Games first came out. They both loved the books. For them, my being in Mockingjay was fairly meaningful.”

Moore’s take on her five most memorable on-screen characters:

    • AMBER WAVES, Boogie Nights (1997). “She has a lot of sexual power, but she’s powerless economically, so ultimately she doesn’t have a lot of choice.”

    • MAUDE LEBOWSKI, The Big Lebowski (1998). “Her power comes from her social hierarchy: She’s wealthy and a member of the 1 percent.”

    • JULES, The Kids Are All Right (2010). “She has a lot of authority within her family, but now that her kids are growing up, she feels like she’s losing her position.”

    • SARAH PALIN, Game Change (2012). “She came into the election with the kind of charisma that people don’t often see in politics. But ultimately she was at the behest of the Republican Party.”

    • ALMA COIN, The Hunger Games: Mockingjay (2014). “She is about political power— how you wield it and what you are trying to gain.”

On Phillip Seymour Hoffman:

When asked about her old friend—Moore worked with Hoffman on three other films, Magnolia, Boogie Nights and The Big Lebowski—her face becomes flushed with emotion. “What is there to say? It was a terrible, ridiculous, untimely loss. It’s difficult,” she says, her voice tightening, “because I’m not sure how his family wants to deal with all this. It’s not my place. But I can talk about him as a colleague: He was an extraordinary talent and a lovely human being.”

How being older has changed her views on Hollywood and the choices she makes: “I used to think, Life’s really challenging. Things are tough, so they should be tough in a book, in a movie. They should be sad,” she says. “But the older I get, the more I like happy endings.”

“When you’re starting out in this business, you feel like you’re not in charge, that you’re still looking to the world for a kind of validation. But as you get older, you realize that direction comes from yourself, from your own desires and responsibilities. You choose your work. You choose your life. That’s where your power comes from—and that’s a great feeling.”

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