DVD Reviews

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part I – Blu-ray Review

By Dana Rae Mar 3, 2012, 23:53 GMT

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part I – Blu-ray Review

In the highly anticipated fourth installment of The Twilight Saga, a marriage, honeymoon and the birth of a child bring unforeseen and shocking developments for Bella (Kristen Stewart) and Edward (Robert Pattinson) and those they love, including new complications with werewolf Jacob Black (Taylor Lautner). ...more

Guilty pleasure commence! The fourth installment of the much anticipated vampire vs. werewolves with beautiful Bella caught in the middle series comes to Blu-ray.

Not that every female ages 12-45 hasn’t read the books. But wait, there is one! I haven’t. I will admit I tried and just couldn’t get into them. So perhaps I am not the right and just person to review this movie. Or perhaps I am, as I am just reviewing the movie as a movie and not a book vs. movie comparison.

With that said, I wasn’t really impressed. In fact, I was quite bored. The movie starts off with Bella (Kristen Stewart) anticipating or dreading her impending nuptials with the sparkly vampire Edward (Robert Pattinson). I say ‘dreading’ because as an actress Stewart tends to deadpan every emotion and I couldn’t tell if she was happy or not about getting hitched.

In any case, there is some level of anxiety going on, and perhaps not just normal wedding jitters. The werewolf Jacob (Taylor Lautner) is totally against Bella’s decision, but the two have remained friends. Team Edward or Team Jacob? Bella loves both but is marrying Ed. I guess she picked Edward.

Not being on either team because I am not a fan, I didn’t really care if she stayed friends with Jacob or not. But Jacob’s protection of her is a major part of the story, as I stayed to watch the rest of the movie and found out why he is hanging around for Bella’s sake.

Perhaps the most anticipated scene in the movie was a little bit of a let-down, as I had seen pictures of the wedding-horror dream Bella has with the dead people built up as a wedding cake with bride and groom standing at the top. The concept looked really cool, with the colors of wedding white bleeding red, but in the movie, it seemed cut short.

Horror wedding dream aside, we as the audience are moved to the actual ceremony. A beautiful and super skinny Bella wears white and has a traditional wedding with parents and friends included. After the ceremony, I almost quit watching.

After years of waiting, the film gives fans what they want Bella and Edward at their honeymoon. Edward has borrowed a beautiful little villa that is on an island and after making love once, Edward vows to never again hurt his true love again – he left bruises on her and broke the bed.

Instead, he teaches her to play chess. They play a lot of chess. And since they are on an island, they can’t even go out to eat or get away to see a movie… the only two other people they see are a husband and wife pair, the housekeepers.

Apparently the wife-housekeeper knows what Edward is and she comes in and she berates Edward because the bedroom is torn apart. She calls him a monster and leaves. Stewart deadpans her patented acting technique as Bella seems disturbed by the housekeeper, but not enough to question her love of Edward. Bella is perhaps the weakest female character to ever grace the silver screen. Stewart’s acting doesn’t do anything to dissuade of this.

The film’s tension and conflict comes in the form of an unexpected pregnancy which manifests itself in a few days’ time. (Vampire babies grow faster in the womb than normal babies). The baby begins to drain Bella of strength and vitality. She loses a luster for life and is dying.

I have to, at this point, say that the make-up job on Bella was really good to make her look so bad. Stewart is believable at this point in the movie because she looks as if she is at death’s door waiting to cross the threshold. But I credit any and all make-up effects and or digital effects and not her acting skills.

Of course, the baby ends an otherwise joyous week and half in paradise and thank goodness we don’t see that chess board anymore. Bella and Ed move back home and continue to try to save her life. The baby is killing her, but Bella will not even hear of terminating the pregnancy. The vampires gather ‘round and try to help but nothing really helps until Bella starts to drink blood. Edward, being the good and dutiful husband and soon-to-be father, mixes her bloody drinks and puts straws in them so that she can sip them more effortlessly.

Ah, the joys of motherhood. Normal fears abound. Will I be a good mother? Should this have happened so fast? Why didn’t I use birth control? I am sure all of this goes through Bella’s head as she lies wanly on the couch waiting for Edward to bring her a bloody slushy.

And then there are the un-normal fears as werewolves (who now mentally chit chat with each other when they are in doggy form) gather around their compound and plot to eradicate this blight: a half vampire baby being born. Jacob to the rescue! Team Jacob will rejoice as he finally uses his imprinting abilities, but not in the way expected. In other words: there is a twist at the end that I can’t disclose.

Fans of the movie will also be happy with the special features included on the Blu-ray. They take you into the making of the movie and even capture Bella and Edwards big day.

Although the Twilight franchise final two films should be going out with a bang (maybe they could take notes from a certain boy wizard), Breaking Dawn, Pt. 1 is probably the weakest of the franchise. The film’s ending leaves a lot to be desired, and didn’t really have me counting the days until Pt. 2 arrives. Still, fans of the franchise will no doubt enjoy the movie and the romance.

Visit the DVD database for more information.



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Further Reading on M&C

Kristen Stewart Biography - - Kristen Stewart Movies -
Robert Pattinson Biography - - Robert Pattinson Movies -
Taylor Lautner Biography - - Taylor Lautner Movies -

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